Flipping Anonymity – unique approaches to photographing migrants

Visual storytelling has reached new heights in the 21st century. With major technological advances within the journalism and filmmaking world, digital media has become so advanced that it can now place a viewer in the United States in the shoes of a young Syrian girl in a refugee camp in Jordan. Last week on this blog,… Continue reading Flipping Anonymity – unique approaches to photographing migrants

Our February newsletter is out!

A Maasai man puts up a newly obtained solar lamp to keep predators away from the herds, in the village of Koora, Kenya, Tuesday, August 18, 2015. (Photo credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

Check out our latest projects, as well as news from the storytelling world. This month, we launched an innovative interactive documentary for UNICEF Lebanon on Syrian refugee children who dream of an education. We also addressed pressing topics regarding the refugee crisis, the potentially catastrophic failure of Iraq’s Mosul dam and this year’s controversial World… Continue reading Our February newsletter is out!

How interactive storytelling is humanizing the internet

“We are human, we are not animals, why can’t we cross the border?” These words, spoken by a refugee standing at the barbed wire fence now separating Greece and Macedonia featured in the documentary Trapped, echo the sentiments of thousands of migrants around the world as nations have begun closing off their borders at a… Continue reading How interactive storytelling is humanizing the internet

The World Press Photo winner – promoting violence or not?

The World Press Photo announced the winners of this year’s contest on Monday, and the winning image has created a lot of buzz, both negative and positive. Turkish photographer Burhan Özbilici took the powerful photograph mere seconds after the assassination of the Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrey Karlov, at a gallery where he was speaking… Continue reading The World Press Photo winner – promoting violence or not?

How smart devices are helping NGOs

As the world becomes more interconnected and tech-savvy, communities are becoming increasingly reliant on smartphones. Even in much of the developing world, owning a smartphone has become commonplace. It’s not just a fun electronic gadget — it’s often a lifeline. Smartphone ownership in developing nations has risen exponentially, with nearly 40 percent of those populations… Continue reading How smart devices are helping NGOs